TweetDeck Launches V2 for iPhone

26 04 2011

Amidst all of the buzz around Twitter’s $50 million bid for Tweetdeck, a new app for the iPhone is launched today. To date the iPhone version has been something of a compromise; a big box solution squeezed into the narrower confines of a handheld device.

Version 2 is not an update; it’s more of a re-imagined mobile version of the uber popular (pun intended) twitter client.  It’s faster, better looking, has more features, is considerably more intuitive and it feels like it has been designed for the iPhone rather that simply engineered to fit.

Improved aspects of iPhone TweetDeck include more effective swiping between columns, better navigation and an add column flow button.  Using the “pinch” move on a column provide options to add new feeds into a column.   V2 is also OS4 compatible so as well as retina-quality graphics there is multi-tasking support.  Best of all it’s still free – for now at least.

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Superinjunctions and the Social Web

21 04 2011

It began in earnest with Trafigura but the freedom to publish now means that the superinjuction, a form of gagging order in which the press is prohibited from reporting even the existence of the injunction, or any details of it, is now almost impossible to enforce.

In the case of Trafigura The Guardian reported that it had been prevented from covering remarks made in Parliament by a superinjunction from libel lawyers Carter Ruck.   The Guido Fawkes blog identified that the question related to the allegations of waste dumping in the Ivory Coast by oil trader Trafigura.  Alan Rusbridger, editor of The Guardian tweeted about it and Stephen Fry played a key role in spreading the story via twitter.

In recent weeks superinjunctions have been used by actors, TV presenters, bankers and footballers to prevent papers from revealing stories about their private lives.  A quick search for the word superinjuction on Twitter or using Google Realtime search and you will see the names of many of the alleged protagonists.   When I began my career in PR you needed to have good contact in a national newsroom to get the sort of information that never made it into print, now you just need a rudimentary knowledge of how to use a search engine.








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